White House Petition Seeking Charges Against #47Traitors Surpasses 100K

Petition Seeks Charges Against #47Traitors Over Iran Letter

Petition Seeks Charges Against #47Traitors Over Iran Letter (Photo Credit: Twitter via @patfrederickson)

A petition to file charges against the 47 dunderheads who signed the Iran letter in an act to sabotage President Obama is heating it up. So far, nearly 149,000 people have signed the petition. It’s also hilarious that the 47 senators, led by Tom Cotton (R-AR), are blaming the president for their letter, which may have violated the Logan Act. Dumbasses. Yeah, I said. That’s even as some Republicans are saying writing the Iran letter was a bad idea.

TREASON CHARGES PETITION:  On March 9th, 2015, forty-seven United States Senators committed a treasonous offense when they decided to violate the Logan Act, a 1799 law which forbids unauthorized citizens from negotiating with foreign governments. Violation of the Logan Act is a felony, punishable under federal law with imprisonment of up to three years.

At a time when the United States government is attempting to reach a potential nuclear agreement with the Iranian government, 47 Senators saw fit to instead issue a condescending letter to the Iranian government stating that any agreement brokered by our President would not be upheld once the president leaves office.

This is a clear violation of federal law. In attempting to undermine our own nation, these 47 senators have committed treason. Source: White House.gov

#47Traitors: 47 GOP Senators Accused of Sabotaging Obama with Iran Letter

Twitter users slammed the 47 GOP senators who signed the letter sabotaging President Obama’s Iran deal as “traitors.” In fact, there is no other way to sum this up. These people are acting as though we don’t have a president. So much for that minority outreach the RNC has been touting. Never mind the fact that freshman Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) and the others traitors, including breadbag queen Joni Ernst, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul, just made it very hard for Sen. Bob Corker to get bipartisan support for legislation he was crafting to address the Iran situation.

Regardless of President Obama’s fecklessness in negotiating a nuclear deal with Iran, 47 Republican U.S. senators engaged in treachery by sending a letter to the mullahs aimed at cutting the legs out from under America’s commander-in-chief.

We join GOP signatories in opposing the pact as outlined, but we strenuously condemn their betrayal of the U.S. constitutional system.

The participants represented the bulk of the Republicans’ 54-member senatorial majority, vesting their petulant, condescending stunt with the coloration of an institutional foreign policy statement.

They are an embarrassment to the Senate and to the nation. Source: NY Daily News

The New York Daily News cover page says it alls:  TRAITORS

#47Traitors:  Slams 47 GOP Senators Sabotaging Obama Iran Deal as Traitors

#47Traitors: Slams 47 GOP Senators Sabotaging Obama Iran Deal as Traitors (Photo Credit: NY Daily News cover page)

I especially like the response for the Iranian foreign minister Dr. Javad Zarif:

Asked about the open letter of 47 US Senators to Iranian leaders, the Iranian Foreign Minister, Dr. Javad Zarif, responded that “in our view, this letter has no legal value and is mostly a propaganda ploy.  It is very interesting that while negotiations are still in progress and while no agreement has been reached, some political pressure groups are so afraid even of the prospect of an agreement that they resort to unconventional methods, unprecedented in diplomatic history.  This indicates that like Netanyahu, who considers peace as an existential threat, some are opposed to any agreement, regardless of its content.

Zarif expressed astonishment that some members of US Congress find it appropriate to write to leaders of another country against their own President and administration. He pointed out that from reading the open letter, it seems that the authors not only do not understand international law, but are not fully cognizant of the nuances of their own Constitution when it comes to presidential powers in the conduct of foreign policy.

Foreign Minister Zarif added that “I should bring one important point to the attention of the authors and that is, the world is not the United States, and the conduct of inter-state relations is governed by international law, and not by US domestic law. The authors may not fully understand that in international law, governments represent the entirety of their respective states, are responsible for the conduct of foreign affairs, are required to fulfil the obligations they undertake with other states and may not invoke their internal law as justification for failure to perform their international obligations.

The Iranian Foreign Minister added that “Change of administration does not in any way relieve the next administration from international obligations undertaken by its predecessor in a possible agreement about Iran`s peaceful nuclear program.” He continued “I wish to enlighten the authors that if the next administration revokes any agreement with the stroke of a pen, as they boast, it will have simply committed a blatant violation of international law.

He emphasized that if the current negotiation with P5+1 result in a Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, it will not be a bilateral agreement between Iran and the US, but rather one that will be concluded with the participation of five other countries, including all permanent members of the Security Council, and will also be endorsed by a Security Council resolution.

Zarif expressed the hope that his comments “may enrich the knowledge of the authors to recognize that according to international law, Congress may not modify the terms of the agreement at any time as they claim, and if Congress adopts any measure to impede its implementation, it will have committed a material breach of US obligations.

Conservatives Now Hate Spock Because Obama Loves the Star Trek Character

Conservatives Now Hate Leonard Nimoy Because Obama Loves Spock

Conservatives Now Hate Leonard Nimoy Because Obama Loves Spock (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

There is no logic with some on the right. The Washington Free Beacon’s editor-in-chief Matthew Continetti penned an article saying he hated Spock. Um, that’s only after President Obama said he loved the Star Trek character.

I loved Spock,” said President Obama, reacting to the death of actor Leonard Nimoy. Why? Because Spock reminds him of himself. The galaxy’s most famous Vulcan, the president wrote, was “Cool, logical, big-eared, and level headed, the center of Star Trek’s optimistic, inclusive vision of humanity’s future.” Just like you know whom.

The president is not the only writer who hasdrawn comparisons between himself and Spock. I am also a Star Trek fan, but I admit I was somewhat confused by my rather apathetic reaction to Nimoy’s death. And as I thought more about the president’s statement, I realized he identifies with the very aspects of the Spock character that most annoy me. I don’t love Spock at all.

Continetti was slammed on the Washington Free Beacon’s Facebook page, though there were some comments in support of his idiotic column:

Right wing freakout over Obama loving Spock

Right wing freakout over Obama loving Spock

Transcript: President Obama’s Selma Speech Commemorating Bloody Sunday

Transcript: President Obama's Selma Speech Commemorating Bloody Sunday

Transcript: President Obama’s Selma Speech Commemorating Bloody Sunday (Photo Credit: White House/Pete Souza)

OBAMA’S SELMA SPEECH:  President Obama gave an arousing and powerful speech on Saturday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” when about 600 marchers were gassed and beaten by police as they marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala.

Here’s the full text of President Obama’s Selma speech:

It is a rare honor in this life to follow one of your heroes. And John Lewis is one of my heroes.

Now, I have to imagine that when a younger John Lewis woke up that morning fifty years ago and made his way to Brown Chapel, heroics were not on his mind. A day like this was not on his mind. Young folks with bedrolls and backpacks were milling about. Veterans of the movement trained newcomers in the tactics of non-violence; the right way to protect yourself when attacked. A doctor described what tear gas does to the body, while marchers scribbled down instructions for contacting their loved ones. The air was thick with doubt, anticipation, and fear. They comforted themselves with the final verse of the final hymn they sung:

No matter what may be the test, God will take care of you;

Lean, weary one, upon His breast, God will take care of you.

Then, his knapsack stocked with an apple, a toothbrush, a book on government – all you need for a night behind bars – John Lewis led them out of the church on a mission to change America.

President Bush and Mrs. Bush, Governor Bentley, Members of Congress, Mayor Evans, Reverend Strong, friends and fellow Americans:

There are places, and moments in America where this nation’s destiny has been decided. Many are sites of war – Concord and Lexington, Appomattox and Gettysburg. Others are sites that symbolize the daring of America’s character – Independence Hall and Seneca Falls, Kitty Hawk and Cape Canaveral.

Selma is such a place.

In one afternoon fifty years ago, so much of our turbulent history – the stain of slavery and anguish of civil war; the yoke of segregation and tyranny of Jim Crow; the death of four little girls in Birmingham, and the dream of a Baptist preacher – met on this bridge.

It was not a clash of armies, but a clash of wills; a contest to determine the meaning of America.

And because of men and women like John Lewis, Joseph Lowery, Hosea Williams, Amelia Boynton, Diane Nash, Ralph Abernathy, C.T. Vivian, Andrew Young, Fred Shuttlesworth, Dr. King, and so many more, the idea of a just America, a fair America, an inclusive America, a generous America – that idea ultimately triumphed.

As is true across the landscape of American history, we cannot examine this moment in isolation. The march on Selma was part of a broader campaign that spanned generations; the leaders that day part of a long line of heroes.

We gather here to celebrate them. We gather here to honor the courage of ordinary Americans willing to endure billy clubs and the chastening rod; tear gas and the trampling hoof; men and women who despite the gush of blood and splintered bone would stay true to their North Star and keep marching toward justice.

They did as Scripture instructed: “Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer.” And in the days to come, they went back again and again. When the trumpet call sounded for more to join, the people came – black and white, young and old, Christian and Jew, waving the American flag and singing the same anthems full of faith and hope. A white newsman, Bill Plante, who covered the marches then and who is with us here today, quipped that the growing number of white people lowered the quality of the singing. To those who marched, though, those old gospel songs must have never sounded so sweet.

In time, their chorus would reach President Johnson. And he would send them protection, echoing their call for the nation and the world to hear:

“We shall overcome.”

What enormous faith these men and women had. Faith in God – but also faith in America.

The Americans who crossed this bridge were not physically imposing. But they gave courage to millions. They held no elected office. But they led a nation. They marched as Americans who had endured hundreds of years of brutal violence, and countless daily indignities – but they didn’t seek special treatment, just the equal treatment promised to them almost a century before.

What they did here will reverberate through the ages. Not because the change they won was preordained; not because their victory was complete; but because they proved that nonviolent change is possible; that love and hope can conquer hate.

As we commemorate their achievement, we are well-served to remember that at the time of the marches, many in power condemned rather than praised them. Back then, they were called Communists, half-breeds, outside agitators, sexual and moral degenerates, and worse – everything but the name their parents gave them. Their faith was questioned. Their lives were threatened. Their patriotism was challenged.

And yet, what could be more American than what happened in this place?

What could more profoundly vindicate the idea of America than plain and humble people – the unsung, the downtrodden, the dreamers not of high station, not born to wealth or privilege, not of one religious tradition but many – coming together to shape their country’s course?

What greater expression of faith in the American experiment than this; what greater form of patriotism is there; than the belief that America is not yet finished, that we are strong enough to be self-critical, that each successive generation can look upon our imperfections and decide that it is in our power to remake this nation to more closely align with our highest ideals?

That’s why Selma is not some outlier in the American experience. That’s why it’s not a museum or static monument to behold from a distance. It is instead the manifestation of a creed written into our founding documents:

“We the People…in order to form a more perfect union.”

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

These are not just words. They are a living thing, a call to action, a roadmap for citizenship and an insistence in the capacity of free men and women to shape our own destiny. For founders like Franklin and Jefferson, for leaders like Lincoln and FDR, the success of our experiment in self-government rested on engaging all our citizens in this work. That’s what we celebrate here in Selma. That’s what this movement was all about, one leg in our long journey toward freedom.

The American instinct that led these young men and women to pick up the torch and cross this bridge is the same instinct that moved patriots to choose revolution over tyranny. It’s the same instinct that drew immigrants from across oceans and the Rio Grande; the same instinct that led women to reach for the ballot and workers to organize against an unjust status quo; the same instinct that led us to plant a flag at Iwo Jima and on the surface of the Moon.

It’s the idea held by generations of citizens who believed that America is a constant work in progress; who believed that loving this country requires more than singing its praises or avoiding uncomfortable truths. It requires the occasional disruption, the willingness to speak out for what’s right and shake up the status quo.

That’s what makes us unique, and cements our reputation as a beacon of opportunity. Young people behind the Iron Curtain would see Selma and eventually tear down a wall. Young people in Soweto would hear Bobby Kennedy talk about ripples of hope and eventually banish the scourge of apartheid. Young people in Burma went to prison rather than submit to military rule. From the streets of Tunis to the Maidan in Ukraine, this generation of young people can draw strength from this place, where the powerless could change the world’s greatest superpower, and push their leaders to expand the boundaries of freedom.

They saw that idea made real in Selma, Alabama. They saw it made real in America.

Because of campaigns like this, a Voting Rights Act was passed. Political, economic, and social barriers came down, and the change these men and women wrought is visible here today in the presence of African-Americans who run boardrooms, who sit on the bench, who serve in elected office from small towns to big cities; from the Congressional Black Caucus to the Oval Office.

Because of what they did, the doors of opportunity swung open not just for African-Americans, but for every American. Women marched through those doors. Latinos marched through those doors. Asian-Americans, gay Americans, and Americans with disabilities came through those doors. Their endeavors gave the entire South the chance to rise again, not by reasserting the past, but by transcending the past.

What a glorious thing, Dr. King might say.

What a solemn debt we owe.

Which leads us to ask, just how might we repay that debt?

First and foremost, we have to recognize that one day’s commemoration, no matter how special, is not enough. If Selma taught us anything, it’s that our work is never done – the American experiment in self-government gives work and purpose to each generation.

Selma teaches us, too, that action requires that we shed our cynicism. For when it comes to the pursuit of justice, we can afford neither complacency nor despair.

Just this week, I was asked whether I thought the Department of Justice’s Ferguson report shows that, with respect to race, little has changed in this country. I understand the question, for the report’s narrative was woefully familiar. It evoked the kind of abuse and disregard for citizens that spawned the Civil Rights Movement. But I rejected the notion that nothing’s changed. What happened in Ferguson may not be unique, but it’s no longer endemic, or sanctioned by law and custom; and before the Civil Rights Movement, it most surely was.

We do a disservice to the cause of justice by intimating that bias and discrimination are immutable, or that racial division is inherent to America. If you think nothing’s changed in the past fifty years, ask somebody who lived through the Selma or Chicago or L.A. of the Fifties. Ask the female CEO who once might have been assigned to the secretarial pool if nothing’s changed. Ask your gay friend if it’s easier to be out and proud in America now than it was thirty years ago. To deny this progress – our progress – would be to rob us of our own agency; our responsibility to do what we can to make America better.

Of course, a more common mistake is to suggest that racism is banished, that the work that drew men and women to Selma is complete, and that whatever racial tensions remain are a consequence of those seeking to play the “race card” for their own purposes. We don’t need the Ferguson report to know that’s not true. We just need to open our eyes, and ears, and hearts, to know that this nation’s racial history still casts its long shadow upon us. We know the march is not yet over, the race is not yet won, and that reaching that blessed destination where we are judged by the content of our character – requires admitting as much.

“We are capable of bearing a great burden,” James Baldwin wrote, “once we discover that the burden is reality and arrive where reality is.”

This is work for all Americans, and not just some. Not just whites. Not just blacks. If we want to honor the courage of those who marched that day, then all of us are called to possess their moral imagination. All of us will need to feel, as they did, the fierce urgency of now. All of us need to recognize, as they did, that change depends on our actions, our attitudes, the things we teach our children. And if we make such effort, no matter how hard it may seem, laws can be passed, and consciences can be stirred, and consensus can be built.

With such effort, we can make sure our criminal justice system serves all and not just some. Together, we can raise the level of mutual trust that policing is built on – the idea that police officers are members of the communities they risk their lives to protect, and citizens in Ferguson and New York and Cleveland just want the same thing young people here marched for – the protection of the law. Together, we can address unfair sentencing, and overcrowded prisons, and the stunted circumstances that rob too many boys of the chance to become men, and rob the nation of too many men who could be good dads, and workers, and neighbors.

With effort, we can roll back poverty and the roadblocks to opportunity. Americans don’t accept a free ride for anyone, nor do we believe in equality of outcomes. But we do expect equal opportunity, and if we really mean it, if we’re willing to sacrifice for it, then we can make sure every child gets an education suitable to this new century, one that expands imaginations and lifts their sights and gives them skills. We can make sure every person willing to work has the dignity of a job, and a fair wage, and a real voice, and sturdier rungs on that ladder into the middle class.

And with effort, we can protect the foundation stone of our democracy for which so many marched across this bridge – and that is the right to vote. Right now, in 2015, fifty years after Selma, there are laws across this country designed to make it harder for people to vote. As we speak, more of such laws are being proposed. Meanwhile, the Voting Rights Act, the culmination of so much blood and sweat and tears, the product of so much sacrifice in the face of wanton violence, stands weakened, its future subject to partisan rancor.

How can that be? The Voting Rights Act was one of the crowning achievements of our democracy, the result of Republican and Democratic effort. President Reagan signed its renewal when he was in office. President Bush signed its renewal when he was in office. One hundred Members of Congress have come here today to honor people who were willing to die for the right it protects. If we want to honor this day, let these hundred go back to Washington, and gather four hundred more, and together, pledge to make it their mission to restore the law this year.

Of course, our democracy is not the task of Congress alone, or the courts alone, or the President alone. If every new voter suppression law was struck down today, we’d still have one of the lowest voting rates among free peoples. Fifty years ago, registering to vote here in Selma and much of the South meant guessing the number of jellybeans in a jar or bubbles on a bar of soap. It meant risking your dignity, and sometimes, your life. What is our excuse today for not voting? How do we so casually discard the right for which so many fought? How do we so fully give away our power, our voice, in shaping America’s future?

Fellow marchers, so much has changed in fifty years. We’ve endured war, and fashioned peace. We’ve seen technological wonders that touch every aspect of our lives, and take for granted convenience our parents might scarcely imagine. But what has not changed is the imperative of citizenship, that willingness of a 26 year-old deacon, or a Unitarian minister, or a young mother of five, to decide they loved this country so much that they’d risk everything to realize its promise.

That’s what it means to love America. That’s what it means to believe in America. That’s what it means when we say America is exceptional.

For we were born of change. We broke the old aristocracies, declaring ourselves entitled not by bloodline, but endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights. We secure our rights and responsibilities through a system of self-government, of and by and for the people. That’s why we argue and fight with so much passion and conviction, because we know our efforts matter. We know America is what we make of it.

We are Lewis and Clark and Sacajawea – pioneers who braved the unfamiliar, followed by a stampede of farmers and miners, entrepreneurs and hucksters. That’s our spirit.

We are Sojourner Truth and Fannie Lou Hamer, women who could do as much as any man and then some; and we’re Susan B. Anthony, who shook the system until the law reflected that truth. That’s our character.

We’re the immigrants who stowed away on ships to reach these shores, the huddled masses yearning to breathe free – Holocaust survivors, Soviet defectors, the Lost Boys of Sudan. We are the hopeful strivers who cross the Rio Grande because they want their kids to know a better life. That’s how we came to be.

We’re the slaves who built the White House and the economy of the South. We’re the ranch hands and cowboys who opened the West, and countless laborers who laid rail, and raised skyscrapers, and organized for workers’ rights.

We’re the fresh-faced GIs who fought to liberate a continent, and we’re the Tuskeegee Airmen, Navajo code-talkers, and Japanese-Americans who fought for this country even as their own liberty had been denied. We’re the firefighters who rushed into those buildings on 9/11, and the volunteers who signed up to fight in Afghanistan and Iraq.

We are the gay Americans whose blood ran on the streets of San Francisco and New York, just as blood ran down this bridge.

We are storytellers, writers, poets, and artists who abhor unfairness, and despise hypocrisy, and give voice to the voiceless, and tell truths that need to be told.

We are the inventors of gospel and jazz and the blues, bluegrass and country, hip-hop and rock and roll, our very own sounds with all the sweet sorrow and reckless joy of freedom.

We are Jackie Robinson, enduring scorn and spiked cleats and pitches coming straight to his head, and stealing home in the World Series anyway.

We are the people Langston Hughes wrote of, who “build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how.”

We are the people Emerson wrote of, “who for truth and honor’s sake stand fast and suffer long;” who are “never tired, so long as we can see far enough.”

That’s what America is. Not stock photos or airbrushed history or feeble attempts to define some of us as more American as others. We respect the past, but we don’t pine for it. We don’t fear the future; we grab for it. America is not some fragile thing; we are large, in the words of Whitman, containing multitudes. We are boisterous and diverse and full of energy, perpetually young in spirit. That’s why someone like John Lewis at the ripe age of 25 could lead a mighty march.

And that’s what the young people here today and listening all across the country must take away from this day. You are America. Unconstrained by habits and convention. Unencumbered by what is, and ready to seize what ought to be. For everywhere in this country, there are first steps to be taken, and new ground to cover, and bridges to be crossed. And it is you, the young and fearless at heart, the most diverse and educated generation in our history, who the nation is waiting to follow.

Because Selma shows us that America is not the project of any one person.

Because the single most powerful word in our democracy is the word “We.” We The People. We Shall Overcome. Yes We Can. It is owned by no one. It belongs to everyone. Oh, what a glorious task we are given, to continually try to improve this great nation of ours.

Fifty years from Bloody Sunday, our march is not yet finished. But we are getting closer. Two hundred and thirty-nine years after this nation’s founding, our union is not yet perfect. But we are getting closer. Our job’s easier because somebody already got us through that first mile. Somebody already got us over that bridge. When it feels the road’s too hard, when the torch we’ve been passed feels too heavy, we will remember these early travelers, and draw strength from their example, and hold firmly the words of the prophet Isaiah:

“Those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles. They will run and not grow weary. They will walk and not be faint.”

We honor those who walked so we could run. We must run so our children soar. And we will not grow weary. For we believe in the power of an awesome God, and we believe in this country’s sacred promise.

May He bless those warriors of justice no longer with us, and bless the United States of America.

Rudy Giuliani Backtracks: “I Didn’t Intend to Question Obama’s Motives”

Rudy Giuliani Backtracks: "I Didn't Intend to Question Obama's Heart"

Rudy Giuliani Backtracks: “I Didn’t Intend to Question Obama’s Heart” (Photo Credit: YouTube Video Screengrab)

(OPINION) — Rudy Giuliani is now sort of backtracking after being blasted for saying President Obama doesn’t love America and questioning the way he was raised. He is now saying “I didn’t intend to question” Obama’s heart. Um, you think?

Giuliani wrote in a Wall Street Journal op-ed, “My blunt language suggesting that the president doesn’t love America, nothwithstanding, I didn’t intend to question President Obama’s motives or the content of his heart.” He added, “My intended focus really was the effect his words and his actions have on the morale of the country, and how the effect may damage his performance.”

The fact is, Giuliani did attempt to question the president’s motives and the content of his heart. He said of the president, “I do not believe that the president loves America. He doesn’t love you. And he doesn’t love me.” A sincere apology would include the words, “I did not mean to say he doesn’t love America.”

“Obviously, I cannot read President Obama’s mind or heart, and to the extent that my words suggested otherwise, it was not my intention … I bear him no ill will, and in fact think that his personal journey is inspiring and a testament to much of what makes this country great,” Giuliani added.

Giuliani won’t put the outrage to bed with this op-ed. In fact, he continued to punch Obama, saying he doesn’t praise America, when in fact he has done that on many occasions. Paul Waldman notes that President Obama praises America on a regular basis. I guess that’s not enough for Giuliani, who was widely reviled by many constituents in New York City.  Here’s an excerpt from Obama’s State of the Union address in January:

… I still think the cynics are wrong. I still believe that we are one people. I still believe that together, we can do great things, even when the odds are long.

I believe this because over and over in my six years in office, I have seen America at its best. I’ve seen the hopeful faces of young graduates from New York to California, and our newest officers at West Point, Annapolis, Colorado Springs, New London. I’ve mourned with grieving families in Tucson and Newtown, in Boston, in West Texas, and West Virginia. I’ve watched Americans beat back adversity from the Gulf Coast to the Great Plains, from Midwest assembly lines to the Mid-Atlantic seaboard. I’ve seen something like gay marriage go from a wedge issue used to drive us apart to a story of freedom across our country, a civil right now legal in states that seven in 10 Americans call home.

So I know the good, and optimistic, and big-hearted generosity of the American people who every day live the idea that we are our brother’s keeper and our sister’s keeper. And I know they expect those of us who serve here to set a better example.

By the way, the Washington Post‘s Glenn Kessler collected more examples of the president expressing his love for America and praising its exceptionalism.

Ronald Reagan, who Giuliani cited in his “take-down” of Obama, also criticized America, but I guess that’s fine since he’s white and Obama is black. Paul Waldman quoted a speech Reagan delivered on in 1980 on the eve of the election:

Many of us are unhappy about our worsening economic problems, about the constant crisis atmosphere in our foreign policy, about our diminishing prestige around the globe, about the weakness in our economy and national security that jeopardizes world peace, about our lack of strong, straight-forward leadership.

The damage has already been done and Rudy Giuliani should slither back under that rock from whence he came. It’s clear that America doesn’t take him seriously. His failed presidential campaign is proof nobody really wants to hear from a serial cheater. A cheater is always a liar.

Um, I certainly hope Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA), who had his own shady past, will read this op-ed, since he said we should thank Giuliani for saying Obama doesn’t love America. I am not one who uses profanity, but Giuliani deserves a f*ck you for his op-ed.

Right Wing Blogger Erick Erickson: Obama Not a Christian in “Any Meaningful Way”

Right Wing Blogger Erick Erickson: Obama Not a Christian in "Any Meaningful Way"

Right Wing Blogger Erick Erickson: Obama Not a Christian in “Any Meaningful Way” (Photo Credit: Twitter)


Right wing stupidity hits a fever pitch. Right wing blogger Erick Erickson tweeted, “I don’t think Barack Obama is a Christian. He certainly is not one in any meaningful way.” Um, so I guess by his standard Jesus wasn’t a “meaningful” Christian since he was all for helping the poor and the downtrodden. That’s quite the opposite of the Republican Party’s belief. They are all for the fabulously wealthy….#ijs

Here’s the reaction on Twitter to Erick Erickson’s tweet (by the way, he blocked us, must have been after we commented on another stupid tweet he sent in the past):

Presidential Wannabe Scott Walker Says He Doesn’t Know if Obama is a Christian

Presidential Wannabe Scott Walker Says He Doesn't Know if Obama is a Christian

Presidential Wannabe Scott Walker Says He Doesn’t Know if Obama is a Christian (Photo Credit: Donkey Hotey)

Presidential hopeful Gov. Scott Walker (R-WI) is going there — says he’s unaware whether President Obama is a Christian. Ini other words, if he isn’t a Christian he must be a Muslim. Yep, typical birther talk, but he’s forgetting one thing — Obama’s isn’t running for president again. He did that twice and won by a landslide each time. Walker is pandering to the extremists in the Republican Party and that spells doom for his presidential aspiration. What does President Obama being a Christian, or not, have to do with running the country? HYPOCRITES:

“I don’t know,” Walker said in an interview at the JW Marriott hotel in Washington, where he was attending the winter meeting of the National Governors Association.

Told that Obama has frequently spoken publicly about his Christian faith, Walker maintained that he was not aware of the president’s religion.

“I’ve actually never talked about it or I haven’t read about that,” Walker said, his voice calm and firm. “I’ve never asked him that,” he added. “You’ve asked me to make statements about people that I haven’t had a conversation with about that. How [could] I say if I know either of you are a Christian?”

[…]

“To me this is a classic example of why people hate Washington and increasingly they dislike the press,” he said. “The things they care about don’t even remotely come close to what you’re asking about.”

Scott Walker is appealing to right wing lunatics like Red State’s Erick Erickson who tweeted “I don’t think Barack Obama is a Christian. He certainly is not one in any meaningful way.” I cannot believe we are having this discussion, but good for the Democrats. It will  mean the Republicans will get another shellacking in the presidential elections as they did in 2008 and 2012. Scott Walker, Bobby Jindal and Rudy Giuliani attacking President Obama’s love for America and Christianity fits in quite nicely with the narrative that he’s a Muslim sympathizer. Clearly the wingnut have learned nothing from the last two elections.

I was on Walker’s side when they went after him for not having a college degree. I take that back.  I guess he is going to need the support of the fringe element if he is to run for the presidency, so why not alienate independent, black and Hispanic voters in the process. Yeah, white extremists are all he needs to win the election–not. It’s a sad commentary that this is what the conservative movement has become–a bunch of extremists who seem to long for the days when only whites had all the power.

Hey Rudy Giuliani, Weren’t You Raised by Draft-Dodging Felon Harold Giuliani?

HYPOCRISY:  Rudy Giuliani's Dad Did Time in Sing-Sing for Robbing Harlem Milkman

HYPOCRISY: Rudy Giuliani’s Dad Did Time in Sing-Sing for Robbing Harlem Milkman

(OPINION) — Instead of backtracking, failed presidential candidate Rudy Giuliani continues to dig himself even deeper into a rabbit hole because of the birther comments he made at a private dinner questioning President Obama’s love for America. He now says “Obama had a white mother, so I’m not a racist.” Um, really? Think again. To boot, whitewashed Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal jumped in the dogfight by issuing a statement backing Giuliani. Yeah, he’s another story for another article, but Stepin Fetchit is an appropriate label for Jindal. Um, neither he nor Giuliani will ever be what Obama is today — president of the United States. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, a GOP presidential frontrunner, was also demure in his response to Giuliani’s comments, made in his presence at the dinner.

Back to Giuliani…..

He also said President Obama wasn’t brought up the way he and other Americans were to love this country. Um, I didn’t realize Giuliani was in the delivery room and lived with Obama during his formative years. That was a racially-charged comment that was simply disgraceful. He went straight down the birther road and appeals to the fringe of the party.

Instead of doing the decent thing and walking back the comments, he showed up on The Kelly File on Thursday to discuss his comments with host Megyn Kelly. When pressed on whether he wanted to apologize for his comments, he doubled down, claiming that Obama learned communism from his grandfather, who fought in World War II. He also invoked Jeremiah Wright as an example of Obama’s association with people who dislike America. Gee, I wonder how we should view his family’s associations through the years, plus his own association with people like Bernie Kerik, his former police commissioner? If you live in a glass house, don’t throw stones.

It’s funny that Rudy Giuliani should bring up the word “love.” His history where that’s concerned is laughable. Um, if you live in a glass house, don’t throw stones. We remember his history with women. I am pretty sure his ex-wives must have questioned the way he was brought up since he seems to have had a total disrespect for them.

Here’s an excerpt from Giuliani biographer Wayne Barrett’s scathing article in the NY Daily News:

Ask Regina Peruggi, the second cousin he grew up with and married, who was “offended” when Rudy later engineered an annulment from the priest who was his best man on the grounds, strangely enough, that she was his cousin. Or ask Donna Hanover, the mother of his two children, who found out he wanted a separation when he left Gracie Mansion one morning and announced it at a televised press conference.

Or ask Judi Nathan, his third wife, whom he started dating while still married to Hanover and New York mayor. In two SUVs, he and an entourage of six or seven cops traveled 11 times to Judi’s Hamptons getaway at a taxpayer cost of $3,000 a trip. That’s love.

Rudy may have forgotten the half-dozen deferments he won ducking the Vietnam War, even getting the federal judge he was clerking for to write a letter creating a special exemption for him. And remember Bernie Kerik? He’s the Giulaini police commissioner, business partner and sidekick whose nomination as homeland security secretary narrowly preceded indictments. He then did his national service in prison.

Giuliani went so far as to rebuke the President for not being “brought up the way you were and the way I was brought up through love of this country,” a bow no doubt to the parenting prowess of Harold Giuliani, who did time in Sing Sing for holding up a Harlem milkman and was the bat-wielding enforcer for the loan-sharking operation run out of a Brooklyn bar owned by Rudy’s uncle.

Rudy Giuliani is a hypocrite of the highest order and he should be publicly shamed for his attack on President Obama’s love for his country and how he was raised. His daddy was a scumbag too! What I absolutely abhor is the self-righteous hypocrisy from people of his ilk. It’s okay to dislike Obama and his policies, but questioning his love for his country and how he was raised is just despicable and has racial overtones. Is this the way the GOP intends to reach out to moderate voters, including blacks? Whoopi Goldberg said it best….”shut up Rudy.”

Bush-Appointed Judge Temporarily Blocks Obama’s Immigration Executive Order

Bush-Appointed Judge Temporarily Blocks Obama's Immigration Executive Order

Bush-Appointed Judge Temporarily Blocks Obama’s Immigration Executive Order (Photo Credit: White House/Pete Souza)

U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen, who was appointed by president George W. Bush, temporarily blocked President Obama’s immigration executive order late Monday. This means a court will now decide if the executive order was constitutional or if President Obama overstepped his bounds.

The temporary halt by the judge gives the 26-state coalition time to pursue a lawsuit that would permanently stop the president’s orders.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said, “President Obama abdicated his responsibility to uphold the United States Constitution when he attempted to circumvent the laws passed by Congress via executive fiat, and Judge Hanen’s decision rightly stops the President’s overreach in its.”

The federal government is expected to file an appeal against Judge Hanen’s decision.

The first of President Obama’s orders, expanding the program that protects young immigrants from deportation (DREAMERS) if they were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, will not take effect until Feb. 18.

This is a major setback for the Obama administration. The Republican Party has proposed nothing of any substance to reform the broken immigration system. Their hardline stance against the DREAMERS will only further alienate Hispanic voters for the 2016 elections.

Judge Andrew Hanen – Immigration Injunction

Republicans Upset Over Obama’s Slavery Comments at Prayer Breakfast

Republicans Upset Over President Obama's Slavery Comments

Republicans Upset Over President Obama’s Slavery Comments (Photo Credit: Donkey Hotey)

Republicans are upset over President Obama’s slavery comments during his speech at the National Prayer Breakfast. Um, what’s new?

President Obama said:  “Humanity has been grappling with these questions throughout human history,” he told the group, speaking of the tension between the compassionate and murderous acts religion can inspire. “And lest we get on our high horse and think this is unique to some other place, remember that during the Crusades and the Inquisition, people committed terrible deeds in the name of Christ. In our home country, slavery and Jim Crow all too often was justified in the name of Christ.”

Maybe President Obama’s comments are a little over the top when taken in the context of the ISIS atrocities, but America still cannot just ignore the darkest period in its history.