Report: Domestic Violence Has Been Falling for Last 20 Years, Survivor Support Lags

domestic violence 350x234 Report: Domestic Violence Has Been Falling for Last 20 Years, Survivor Support Lags

Report: Domestic Violence Has Been Falling for Last 20 Years, Survivor Support Lags (Credit: Wikipedia)

The Bureau of Justice Statistics released a new analysis of domestic violence from 2003 to 2012 and found that the rates have fallen and has remained low.

Despite the recession, which early reports indicated would drive a rise in domestic violence incidents as families struggled financially, it did not have much of an effect at all.

“Serious violent victimization,” which includes rape, sexual assault, robbery and aggravated assaults, spiked in 2006, but serious domestic violence incidents did not.

domestic violence 1 350x275 Report: Domestic Violence Has Been Falling for Last 20 Years, Survivor Support Lags

Bureau of Justice Statistics: Domestic Violence Has Fallen for Last 20 Years (Chart Credit: BJS)

Domestic violence advocates aren’t too thrilled about the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ findings. They see a growing problem — a persistent gap in support for domestic violence survivors. Despite those rosy numbers from BJS, much more should be done for the survivors.

While the government started giving funds to law enforcement outreach and support for survivors through the Violence Against Women Act, as well as other programs, public awareness has led to victims being less likely to seek out support services.

Monica McLaughlin of the National Network to End Domestic Violence said, “As police response improves, as prosecution and court response improves, as medical response improves, referrals to domestic violence programs go up.”

She said the recession has had an impact on how many survivors seek help from the various services available to them. McLaughlin said “poverty is a co-conspirator of an abuser.” She added that federal funding for shelters and other services has remained flat throughout the recession and the result is a gap between requests for services and the ability to provide them.

 Report: Domestic Violence Has Been Falling for Last 20 Years, Survivor Support Lags

Marco Rubio Among Eight GOP Senators Voting to Block Violence Against Women Act

300px Marco Rubio%2C Official Portrait%2C 112th Congress Marco Rubio Among Eight GOP Senators Voting to Block Violence Against Women Act

Marco Rubio Among Eight GOP Senators Voting to Block Violence Against Women Act. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Eight senators voted to block the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, which is a bill that protects victims of domestic violence. The senators who voted against the bill were:  Sens. Ted Cruz (R-TX), Mike Lee (R-UT), Tim Scott (R-SC), Marco Rubio (R-FL), Mike Johanns (R-NE), Rand Paul (R-KY), Pat Roberts (R-KS), and James Risch (R-ID).

VAWA’s reauthorization has been caught up in partisan gridlock over added provisions that would protect undocumented immigrants, as well as LGBT and Native American victims of domestic violence. Congress failed to reauthorize the bill by the end of 2012, and the Senate is now considering the same legislation again, in its new legislative session.

All of the women in the Senate, with the exception of Sen. Deb Fischer (R-NE), co-sponsored the legislation.

Once Senators consent to take up the measure, it will be voted on in its entirety. It is expected to pass, but will face a tougher battle in the House. Source

 Marco Rubio Among Eight GOP Senators Voting to Block Violence Against Women Act