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US teacher working in Japan stresses WILDly strict rules

An American teacher working in Japan has revealed how the country’s schools are drastically different from the United States, with strict rules prevalent.

Megan Heeney, who is from Kansas and has been living in Kyoto for more than six months, made a TikTok video with an overlay caption that reads, “Things about my Japanese school that could send Americans into a coma.”

The expat then proceeds to list some of the surprising rules she encountered, starting with the absence of outdoor shoes to wear indoors.

She explains, while showing a clip of the school’s shoe racks, “We all have to switch from outdoor to indoor shoes as soon as we enter school.”

Megan Heeney, who is from Kansas and has been living in Kyoto for more than six months, made a TikTok video detailing some of the unusual school rules she witnessed

One of the rules that according to Megan sends her “in an absolute spiral almost every day” is the open window policy. She’s also not mad about the no piercings or makeup rule

Next, Megan says the kids are forced to “clean up the school from top to bottom every single day.”

Demonstrate their housekeeping skills by cutting to clips that showcase immaculately polished hardwood floors and a rack of ironed laundry.

At lunchtime, Megan reveals that the kids serve themselves their own food and clean their own trays instead of a lunch lady doing it for them.

He says on this point: “This certainly drove me crazy, but certainly in a good way.”

One of the rules that according to Megan sends her “in an absolute spiral almost every day” is the open window policy.

The educator explains while modeling a knee-length padded coat: “They leave the windows open and there is no heating or cooling in the hall, so I have to walk around in a coat.”

As for appearance, Megan says her Japanese school is very strict about certain things.

He details many of his top complaints, telling viewers, “Probably the most coma-inducing part is the dress code.

So far, Megan’s video about Japanese schools has been viewed more than 15 million times and many viewers have argued about the rules

No outdoor shoes are allowed in Megan’s school and the pupils have to clean the school “top to bottom” every day

‘Girls should wear their hair in a low over-the-shoulder bob or pony. Definitely no dyed hair, so no anime protagonists.

“And I don’t follow these rules, but no piercings and no makeup.”

So far, Megan’s video about Japanese schools has been viewed more than 15 million times, and many viewers have argued about the rules.

Creator @Hayley wrote, “I honestly like the shoes and having to clean school lunches too but I think the hair thing is weird.”

While @fujiwara_no_fumos said: ‘I like that they clean the school. It gives children a sense of community by encouraging them not to leave a mess for someone else.’

In another TikTok, Megan touches on some more general things about Japan that “might send an American into a coma.”

It starts with “no talking on the phone on trains” and “I honestly don’t like talking”.

The American continues, “I’ve seen a few people do it here and there and they just get judgmental looks.”

In another TikTok, Megan touches on some more general things about Japan that ‘might send an American into a coma’

Next, tap on all you can eat and drink restaurants.

He explains that they are “quite common and quite cheap” in Japan and says that “the all-you-can-drink restaurant is a liability I don’t think Americans can bear.”

One of the rules that Megan says she made a mistake while living in Japan, is the no-shoes policy in the dressing rooms.

She says even the dressing room attendants “give you a sheet to put over your face so you don’t wear makeup or sweat or whatever it is that you’re trying on.”

Continuing on the crossdressing theme, Megan says that when it comes to hot springs or public baths, “you shouldn’t be wearing anything at all.” No bathing suits, no towels, nothing. You should go in there, go out and find out everything.’

Finally, one rule of etiquette that Megan says she’s seen many expats “messe up countless times,” is standing on escalators.

He explains, ‘You don’t have to block the escalator here. What I mean by that is one side of the escalator is for people who want to stand and wait for you to get up.

“The other side is for people who want to walk up. I wish I could tell you which side he’s on, but it varies by region.’

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